Livestock and agroecology

A summary

  • key opportunities for livestock to contribute to the agroecological transition
    Livestock is found in all agroecosystems and includes a diverse range of species and breeds raised in a variety of production systems.
    Livestock play an important role in enhancing food security and nutrition of the public at large and the rural and urban poor in particular by providing access to nutrient dense food (meat, milk, and eggs)
    Livestock is key to the livelihoods of small-scale farmers, particularly women, providing them with income, capital, fertilizer, fuel, draught power, fibers, and hides.
    Agricultural productivity, income, and resilience can be increased by integrating livestock with other production system components such as trees and crop plants.
    By eating fibrous feeds (e.g. grass and straw) and waste (e.g. swill), livestock makes use of biomass that humans cannot eat and increase natural resource use efficiency.
    Animal mobility within and between agroecosystems and landscapes transfers nutrients, biomass and water in the form of animal manure, and moves people’s assets in times
    of disasters such as floods or drought.
    Manure is rich in nutrients and organic matter, which are key to the physical, chemical and biological properties of healthy soilsGood livestock management practices increase plant biodiversity in grasslands, which in turn enhances productivity, resilience, and other ecosystem services
    Livestock are part of climate solutions, through reducing enteric methane emissions and deploying diverse livestock resources to increase resilience on farm

Details in the FAO Report

http://www.fao.org/3/I8926EN/i8926en.pdf

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Mobile pastoralism—A 10,000-year-old practice still robust, if threatened, in the Mediterranean today — ILRI Clippings

Mobile Pastoralism in the Mediterranean: Arguments and evidence for policy reform and its role in combating climate change presents over 100 arguments detailing the benefits of mobile pastoralism to biodiversity, carbon storage, wildfire prevention, climate change, food security and quality, traditional ecological knowledge, rural economies, tourism—to name a few.

via Mobile pastoralism—A 10,000-year-old practice still robust, if threatened, in the Mediterranean today — ILRI Clippings

Sustainable Production and Consumption: A Tale of Tempe… — The Stain’ Home

Greetings! Haven’t been here for a while… perhaps because I have been under with dissertation fever! But now I / we have been tasked with writing a bit about sustainable production and consumption. To be honest, I don’t want to get all ‘researchy and academicky’ but I think one of the most powerful sustainable […]

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Uplifting Nepal’s Rural Smallholder Farmers — Technical Students’ Association of Nepal (TSAN)

Susmita Sigdel, Agriculture and Forestry University Short Abstract Agriculture plays a pivotal role in Nepalese economy and has the potential to significantly reduce poverty, enhance economic growth and entrench economic stability. Seventy percent of the country’s population lives in rural areas, and agriculture is their primary livelihood. While the share of agriculture in total […]

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Jules Pretty on Sustainable Agriculture

The role of the small-scaled family farming is neglected so far.

Cynefin

In recent years, there has been a calling for a more sustainable form of agriculture which will successfully feed a growing population whilst reducing the negative impacts on the environment. One such advocate is Jules Pretty, a multidisciplinary academic and author. This paper will look at Pretty’s contribution to the understanding of sustainable agriculture, drawing on his various publications as well as wider literature. It will begin by assessing Pretty’s interpretation of problems associated with modern food production systems, followed by a critique of his proposals.

The Problem

According to Pretty, there is something seriously wrong with our agricultural and food systems today. The food system is “faster, fitter and more streamlined” yet still flawed (2001). Despite advances in aggregate productivity due to events such as the green revolution where new varieties of crop, inputs and infrastructure tripled world agricultural production between 1961-2007 (Pretty et al. 2011), there have been…

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Camel is Turning from a Beast of Burden to a Modern Farm Animal

The peoples’ intelligence really works. Time is the best teacher.

Natural Health with the Camel Milk

Camel is the composite of all domestic animals with respect to its characteristics. Camel produces milk like the cow, fats like sheep, hair like the goat, riding like the horse, thick milk (Bactrian camel) like yak, work like the donkey, and hardy like mule etc. Every product of camel is useful, even urine and feces are valuable for medicinal use and paper production respectively. The long bones of camel are used by jewelers in some Arab and African countries. The camel rearing communities have very firm links with camel culture and camel production is not only a farming activity but part of heritage and culture.Detailed Nutritional Composition of Bactrian Camel’s Milkcropped-raziq.jpg

Camel was originally domesticated for its milk production in harsh and hostile ecosystems of the dry barren lands of Arabia. Later on, the trait of walking ability was the major selection criteria to use this precious animal in…

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When local knowledge brings innovation: A cattle farmer with a different approach — THE GFAR BLOG

A few days back I visited Manali, a famous tourist destination in northern India. Unlike most of the visitors, my trip was not for fun but research survey work. During one of the conversations with my colleagues, I heard about a farmer named Peter, who is based in Manali. As the name sounded unfamiliar – […]

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