Diversifying Farms and Income with Camel in Sweden

Camel, food security and climate change

Sweden is situated in the north of Europe and is one of the beautiful Scandinavian countries. Winters are very harsh, snowy and dark. Summers are bright with long days and a lot of grasses and flowers. Being a co-scientist and friend of camel researchers of Sweden, I visit this country, national veterinary institute (SVA) and country sides time to time. Dr Kerstin de Verdier, a very humble and kind fellow always materializes this tour and helps in exchange of knowledge and research projects.
A visit to meet and look at the camel (camelids) farms in Sweden was the important part of my visit this term (10-19 September, 2012). I visited Bactrian camel farms in the country sides and met camel owners. I was always warmly welcomed by the camel keepers and shared their experiences. The camel owners here in Sweden are hobbyists and they use camels for eco-tourism and ecosystem…

View original post 1,075 more words

Advertisements

Ban Genetically Modified Food

Source: NaturalNews.com Amy Goodrich August 17, 2016 Russia has adopted a new law that prohibits all GMO crop cultivation and GMO animal breeding in the Russian Federation, to prevent the release of GMOs into the environment. Furthermore, the new law allows the Russian government to restrict the import of GMO products that may pose a […]

via Genetically Modified Food [GMO] ban expands in Russia as Putin halts all production and imports — TheBreakAway

A School Farming

Hello from a back porch in the Midwest. Though I live in the suburbs, I feel at home here at Celi’s site. You see, I like to think that I grew up on a farm. One that is still productive in Northern Greece. Well, I didn’t actually grow up there, I was 30 when I […]

via Guest Post: A school of Farming — Th kitchens garden

Khurasani Goat Breed

Camel, food security and climate change

Habitat: The historic great Khurasan, Toba Kakari, Suleiman mountains region of Zhob and Sherani districts, Qillasaifullah, Loralai, Ziarat, Chaghai and Pishin districts are the main niche of the breed. The breed is equally raised by nomadic, semi-nomadic, agro pastoral tribes of Pashtoon people. The Baloch tribes of Chaghai-Kharan desert also raise this breed. The nomads with Khurasani breed move from Khurasan in autumn and may reach to Indus delta and some tribes reach to Chaghai-Kharan desert. The breed is trans-boundary.

Phenotypic characteristics: The phenotypic characteristics of Khurasani breed are black long hair coat, turned back horns and fine second hair coat in winter. The breed is predominantly black in colour with red face but some other colour is also found occasionally. The males have beard also.

Vegetation:Acacia modesta, Caragana ambigua, Bararr, Gurgulla, Sarwane, Showan, Wanna, Barrai, Ghalmi, Shorai, Lani, Azghai, Sassi, Ghaz, Korai, Sperbutai, Oma, Murgha, Tarkha…

View original post 160 more words

Problems and Constraints of Indigenous Livestock Keepers of Balochistan

Camel, food security and climate change

Livestock keeping is one of the main agricultural activity in the historic grazing lands of Balochistan. More than 50% of the native people of the province rely (completely or partially) on livestock. The region is the cradle of livestock breeds domestication, later on, evolved with the tune of climate change and consumers’ demand for the livestock products. Today the livestock keepers of the province have very specialized livestock breeds fulfilling the multipurpose breeding goals of the keepers. In spite of all their good role they play, the livestock keepers of here are neglected, discouraged and left unattended. The main issues are hereby raised in the ensuing lines. 

Decreasing potential of rangelands: Rangelands production potential had been decreased manifold because of the long drought periods and overgrazing. Deforestation made the situation adverse more than ever. The vegetation of the rangelands had been removing for fuel wood very continuously. Both the types…

View original post 847 more words

Added benefits of reducing meat and dairy consumption

When we think of the big drivers of climate change, cars and air travel often come to mind. But transformations over the past century in the way food is produced and consumed have resulted in more greenhouse gas emissions than those from transportation. The biggest culprits? Industrial meat and dairy.

In addition to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, reducing consumption in the countries that currently eat too much meat and dairy could have significant health and social welfare benefits. One study shows that reducing meat consumption as a means of fighting climate change would also cut the risk of colon cancer, heart disease and lung disease worldwide by 34 percent.[31] Another says it would reduce global mortality by 6 to 10 percent by 2050, translating into a healthcare cost savings of US$735 billion per year.[32]

DSC07248

Other scientists point out that cutting meat and dairy consumption would cut infectious disease and reduce the emergence of antibiotic resistance, and have secondary effects as well.[33] One model shows that the worldwide adoption of a healthy diet could reduce mitigation costs for the energy sector by more than 50 percent by 2050.[34] It would also free up land now used for animal feed production and, if combined with other policy measures, could help small farmers access much-needed land.

untitled

For details, please go to the link below for GRAIN Report

Grabbing the bull by the horns: it’s time to cut industrial meat and dairy to save the climate

Sustainable livestock systems – highlights from ILRI’s corporate report 2015–2016

In 2015–2016, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and partners revealed extraordinary findings that the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from cattle in Kenya maybe up to 10 times lower than previous estimates, clearly making the case for improving Africa-specific understanding of GHG emissions to develop better-targeted climate change mitigation and adaption strategies. Taking this research one step further, working with governments and other civil society partners, offers opportunities to bring about change in international policies benefitting smallholder farmers, as was shown with the passing of the United Nations Environment Assembly resolution on combatting climate change. Moreover, translating research in a favourable policy environment paves the way for capacity building that can translate into the mass scaling of the sustainable intensification of farming.

via Sustainable livestock systems – highlights from ILRI’s corporate report 2015–2016 — ILRI news