Smallholder farmers and research

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Enhancing capacity of extension officers in Kenyan drylands

To bridge the gap between research and information dissemination to smallholder farmers, extension officers were trained on integrated agronomic management of chickpea, pigeonpea, groundnut, sorghum and finger millet for enhanced yields. The training was held from 9-12 June at Egerton University’s Dryland Research Training and Ecotourism Centre, Chemerron, located in the dryland county of Baringo.

Read the text: ICRISAT

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Participatory methods to help farmers adapt to climate change

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Photo credit: SciDevNet

Local farmer Ibrahim Mohamedou waters his plants with a watering can at an IFAD-supported nursery, part of an anti-desertification programme near the village of Zabon Mousso. Ibrahim, who has been working on nursery projects such as this one for over ten years, says of his work: ‘I am always encouraged to continue this work when I see my trees growing big. When people don’t look after them it makes me very angry’.

Project initiated to build resilient farming systems

by Samuel Hinneh

“The CGIAR system through the [Research Program on] CCAFS is willing through these kind of projects to generate the scientific knowledge and evidence about agricultural options that can work well in West Africa.” Jules Bayala, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

Speed read

  • The project is being implemented in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Niger and Senegal
  • It aims to use participatory methods to help farmers adapt to climate change

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Breeding salt-tolerant plants

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Photo credit: Nature World News

Certain grasses can be made more salt-tolerant, allowing us to use treated wastewater for it and save clean water for human use. (Photo : Flickr)

Drought: Saving Water with Plant Genetics, Breeding Salt Tolerance

By Catherine Arnold

As arid conditions increase in various parts of the nation and world, scientists focus are focusing on using drought-resistant plants and increasing the number of plants able to use treated wastewater that still contains salt. The less water for plants, the more clean water for humans.

Athletic fields and golf courses remain heavy users of water. Golf courses alone use approximately 750 billion gallons of water annually in arid regions. Most plants on the fields still cannot tolerate a lot of salt.

Researcher Stacy Bonos, at the Department of Plant Biology & Pathology at Rutgers University, and her team recently published their research on perennial ryegrass…

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